You Have to See the Inside of This '70s Tractor-Trailer Motorhome

You Have to See the Inside of This '70s Tractor-Trailer Motorhome

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If you’re looking for a vehicle that thumbs its nose at two separate gas-crisis eras across several decades, Bring a Trailer has a listing that might just interest you. This 1974 Ford C-750 Camelot Cruiser Motorhome comes with a full house on the back, plus two snowmobiles and space to park them. It can be all yours, if you act fast.

This two-tone darling is being offered at Bring A Trailer, but was on sale via WorldWideAuctioneers in the fall of 2021, according to RVTravel. BaT notes it was picked up by the selling buyer in November of this year, and so now graces its own auction. This particular Ford C-750 was turned into a Camelot Cruiser by Edler & Company of Skokie, Illinois. Only three Camelot Cruisers were ever built, according to RV Travel:

Manufactured in Skokie, Illinois, by Edler & Company, the Camelot Cruiser was the epitome of luxury and opulence in the early ‘70s. Dick Edler built the first Camelot Cruiser out of necessity.

After years of working, he sought an RV that could sustain not only his family but their four Saint Bernard dogs as they traveled around in retirement. The very first one built was specific to the Edler family needs, a tradition that kept going with the subsequent builds.

The rig is, indeed big. Big and opulent. The entire truck and trailer combo stretches 55 feet long and weighs in at 40,000 pounds. Edler’s dedication to details made these vehicles as legendary as their literary name suggests:

The Camelot Cruisers came fully furnished with any and all kitchen appliances one could need. An extra large double-sink provides ample space for washing and cooking, and all the drawers are stocked with every manner of pots, pans and utensils.

Edler stated, “I can’t imagine something worse than selling a $150,000 RV to someone and having their first night be ruined because they don’t have a can opener.” Edler was so adamant about the first night being a success that he even included four porterhouse steaks and all the necessary utensils and seasonings for a great night on the road.

At $150,000 in 1974, a Camelot Cruiser would set you back $905,000 in today’s money, according to the U.S. inflation calculator. And according to the U.S. Census, the average take-home pay for an American in 1974 was $16,070. No wonder Edler wanted to make sure it came with a can opener.

So while it might look like the Scooby-Do gang’s retirement vehicle to us, you are looking at a time capsule of early opulent ’70s luxury with real trucker bona fides. From the BaT listing:

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Power is from a 391ci V8 paired with a four-speed automatic transmission, and both the truck and trailer are finished in two-tone green. The truck is equipped with a chrome front bumper, 22.5″ steel wheels, air-assisted brakes, dual air horns, a CB radio, a sleeping surface, and an intercom system.

[…]

The 391ci V8 sends power to the rear wheels through a four-speed automatic transmission. Service performed under prior ownership in 2022 reportedly involved overhauling the carburetor, cleaning and coating the fuel tanks, and replacing the fuel pump, fuel filter, spark plugs, ignition wires, distributor cap, and rotor.

That’s right, you can make your least favorite kid sleep in a little luggage rack in the cab.

Go sleep in the cab! I don’t care if it smells like cold coffee and jerky farts. You know exactly why Jeremy!

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Or maybe that’s for your professional driver while you and your monied family members hop on your snowmobiles and ride off into the well-curated wilds. But the powder would need to be pretty perfect to get anyone out of such a lush, luxurious interior:

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From its green and gold shag carpet to its drop ceiling, this thing is so deeply ’70s it hurts to look directly at it. It’s a complete assault on the senses. Peering at it from the side allows for some of the clashing colors and dark wood paneling to become much more charming.

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Still, this motorhome should come with a warning on the side that viewers may spontaneously sprout bell bottoms and mustache hair within 10 feet of the vehicle.

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You know what I say: No better fabric for a shower curtain than crushed puke-green velvet. And you know, I didn’t truly grasp how over-the-top this motorhome was until I saw the double sinks. Where I grew up in the ’80s and ’90s, double sinks in your home were still a sign that you had made it big. And here’s two of them in a motorhome from a previous decade. True opulence.

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And then there’s the pair of Poloron snowmobiles stored at basement level. Surprise! Even the storage area is carpeted with the same yellow, green and brown color scheme as the rest of the motorhome. This thing is giving off massive Grandma’s-house vibes. Really, it’s more of a truly mobile trailer home.

With only 32,000 miles on the odometer you’re sure to have plenty of adventures with this piece of history. Just don’t you dare touch that interior. It wouldn’t be the same with out the horrifying color scheme or the scent of gas-station-quality incense and mothballs lingering forever on the fabric. Truck and trailer come with a clean title and you get a bill of sale with the snowmobiles. At the time of this writing there is one week left on the auction, and the price sits at $55,500.

This isn’t the only 750-series camper out there, of course. Some folks are even giving it a try with modern big Ford trucks. Sure, this massive, $6 million F-750 motorhome doesn’t have the charm of the Camelot Cruiser’s green-on-green cab-over design, but it includes all the comforts of home like a living area, full bathroom and kitchen, and enough space to sleep six.